Mr. Struggan sends his regards.
Shameless Plug Sunday: Redux
Wilson here. Mr. Struggan does not like repeating himself, but clearly you all weren’t listening when he told you about Mellow Pages Library, the coolest, most radically awesome independent library in the world.*
Currently, their IndieGoGo campaign stands at $3,664 of their $20,000 goal, and there are only 3 days left for you to donate. This is an embarrassment, a disappointment, a fucking travesty. Give them a dollar, or ten, or a hundred. It’s important, damn it!
Mr. Struggan sends his emphatic regards. 
*based on scientific data collected from the mind of Mr. Struggan 

Shameless Plug Sunday: Redux

Wilson here. Mr. Struggan does not like repeating himself, but clearly you all weren’t listening when he told you about Mellow Pages Library, the coolest, most radically awesome independent library in the world.*

Currently, their IndieGoGo campaign stands at $3,664 of their $20,000 goal, and there are only 3 days left for you to donate. This is an embarrassment, a disappointment, a fucking travesty. Give them a dollar, or ten, or a hundred. It’s important, damn it!

Mr. Struggan sends his emphatic regards. 

*based on scientific data collected from the mind of Mr. Struggan 

Shameless Plug Sunday: Regarding Mellow Pages Library

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Mellow Pages Library
56 Bogart St, Bushwick, NY

Hello, dear readers. Wilson here, presenting a special Shameless Plug Sunday Regard from Mr. Struggan. As you are aware from our book reviews, Mr. Struggan is an avid reader. What you might not know about Mr. Struggan, though, is that he is also an avid library lover. Mr. Struggan’s two most favoritest librarians, Matt Nelson and Jacob Perkins, are the custodians of the legendary Mellow Pages Library in Brooklyn. They are in need of your help, and Mr. Struggan is here to tell you why you should give it to them. 

Mellow Pages Library is an independent library and reading room located in the heart of Bushwick. Matt and Jacob, in running the space, take pride in two things most of all, their commitment to making available to the public the widest range of small and independent press publications possible, and their commitment to doing so free of charge. That second part is where you come in. Over the last year or so, Mellow pages has enjoyed rapid expansion, which has brought with it much added responsibility that, so far, Matt and Jacob have carried themselves. To insure that their positive vision for the library and its mission continues, they are now launching their first fundraiser via IndieGoGo to help cover the rent, upgrade the space, and maybe even provide a bit of wage to their volunteers. 

Mr. Struggan cannot stress enough how awesome it would be if you threw a little bit of capital Mellow Pages’ way. It would be so awesome, in fact, that Mr. Struggan has a proposition for you: share/retweet/reblog this post and spread the word, and you could receive from Mr. Struggan a free one-year membership to the library. How’d you like them apples books? Very much so, Mr. Struggan would bet. Check the link at the top to contribute to the campaign, and don’t forget to stay mellow. 

Mr. Struggan sends his shameless regards. 

Regarding Siegfried Vol. 1 by Alex Alice

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Siegfried Vol. 1, 2012
Alex Alice

Nico here. As a participant in the Graphic Novel Reading Group at Politics & Prose Bookstore, I read at least one graphic novel per month. Mr. Struggan has invited me to share my criticism of this month’s selected reading here.

Alex Alice’s Siegfried is the first volume of a three part adaptation of German composer Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle, a pretty grand story to be condensed into 50 pages of comics. Alice weaves the origin-story of Siegfried, a boy who is friends with wolves, raised by an outcast and whose mother was a goddess. Pretty epic.

Unsurprisingly, Alice’s art is heavily french-influenced, from the looks of characters to unabashedly cinematic paneling, even to the innocent, hopeful tone of the story. His warm, romantic style is evocative of late ’70s heavy metal, The Legend of Zelda, and the art of Disney animated films, an influence the artist credits.

It’s a beautiful book. Alice deftly mixes hand-drawn and computer-generated illustration to create evocatively, detailed panels. As good as the graphics are, the quality of the materials used in printing made a huge difference. With a hard cover and glossy pages, no expense was spared.

As strong as the work is, Siegfried may be a little too psyched about itself. Over 60 pages of an interview with Alex Alice and preliminary sketches are nice, but unwarranted. I might expect these extras in a reprint, but not a first edition. As nice as they are, I’d prefer the first edition to let the work speak for itself. That said, it’s a great change of pace from diaristic indie comics and more familiar American comic books.

Mr. Struggan sends his High Regards.

Regarding The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

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The Perks of Being a Wallflower, 1999
Stephen Chbosky

Nico here. For the first literary review on Regards, I asked Mr. Struggan if I could review the modern cult classic The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky. This fall, I saw the cinematic adaptation of this novel and have been curious about it since.

The film was not my first encounter with Perks. During my freshman year of high school, a classmate recited a poem by Michael, a character who commits suicide in the story, for an oratory contest. Needless to say, the poem is not a bright point. I wholeheartedly congratulate this classmate for for creating an excellently awkward silence in a theatre of approximately 240 students and administrators.

Moments like this real life one are common throughout Perks. Chbosky’s novel is made up of letters from Charlie during his freshman year of high school. As Charlie develops as a writer, his morbid observations of adolescence skew more towards inspiring hope.

Is it a happy book? Sort of. It’s exciting. The reader roots for a kid who has a lot of strikes against him and achieves a lot in his first year of high school. Charlie’s victories remind the reader that milestones in high school lead to things ahead. I think a reader in high school might also be excited about illicit activities they were reading about in the book. 

Chbosky, a screenwriter by trade, tells a good story with Perks. The letters make up scenes, and are not drawn out. As opposed to larger acts or chapters, the story moves incrementally and skips from week to week.

I wonder what a reader still in high school thinks while reading it. Are they excited? Are they heartened? Maybe they dwell more on the negative aspects of that period of life. Chbosky believes that if misery has company, all bad things come to pass.

Mr. Struggan sends his High Regards.

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